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Starting Pitching

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The early returns on the starting rotation:

Jason Schmidt

The fastball is livelier this April, for sure, but the control still hasn't rebounded. When Schmidt was the aciest ace the Giants had watched in years, he wasn't walking nearly as many batters as he had earlier in his career. It's almost as if he's reverted a bit. The early returns are promising, and the high ERA doesn't tell the story, but he could use a quicker hook at times. Just because he aced up the place up acey fierce in the past, doesn't mean he's infallible after 110 pitches.

Matt Morris

He's a Gamer, who Goes Out to Win. He has already awarded 12 experience points to Matt Cain, and brings a +16 charisma into the Giant clubhouse. The curveball's nice, and it's nice to have at least one pitcher who you would be surprised to watch walk the bases loaded.

Noah Lowry

Dang it. He looked so good for an inning. *Pours a bit of his 40 out for Noah's oblique muscle.*

Matt Cain

He's a pitcher with a fastball so crisp, he can blow it by a hitter that's waiting for it. Most of the time, that is. Edgar Renteria wasn't particularly impressed, sending a Cain fastball 425 feet into the night, and doing it after Cain walked a runner on. Until Cain can snap off a nice breaking ball with consistency, that will probably be the pattern for a while. With Lowry on the shelf, Cain is the pitcher most fun to watch.

Jamey Wright

Good sinker. At times, it's a great sinker that allows him to quickly mow through a lineup. Then he'll have an inning where he throws 49 straight pitches out of the strike zone, and gives up some key hits. His start on Saturday showed his potential for both beauty and terror. If he had his terror inning in the first two innings, I might not have been as impressed. Still, I can see why he - much like Brett Tomko - keeps getting chances.

The staff has struggled overall, but it's hard to wave a pointy stick of worry at any specific starter. They have all looked about as expected, even if the small sample-size ERAs are a little out of whack.