Post-game thread: Second place again

A world where the Giants go into Coors Field and win more often than not? Sounds nice, but you know not what you ask. A world where the Giants win at Coors Field is a world in which your gammy goes through your wallet and takes out a twenty when you’re in the bathroom. A world where the Giants win at Coors Field is one in which you wake up and find your girlfriend or boyfriend hanging from the ceiling by their freshly grown talons, staring at you with blood-red eyes and baring their fangs. That is not your world. That is not your world.

In my world, gammy gives me a twenty on my birthday, my wife is talon-free, and when the Giants go into Colorado 1.5 games ahead, they’re leaving .5 games back. If the Giants went into Coors and took a short two-game series, anything could have happened. Flying spiders, for example. Do you want to go on a picnic, turn around, and see a tarantula the size of your fist hovering right in front of your face? That’s where we were heading after two straight series wins in Colorado.

The game was lost when a pitcher made an error. I set my computer to paste that sentence in when I hit Ctrl-Y. There’s nothing you can do about the errors. Extra infield practice is just going to annoy the pitchers, if not make them unnecessarily tired. Jim Kaat doesn’t live on some Tibetan peak, dispensing wisdom to anyone with the courage to visit. You’re not ever going to add or subtract pitchers based on their fielding prowess. The takeaways from the game:

  • Man, wasn’t Jonathan Sanchez fantastic? Before the eighth, that is?
  • Field better, Giants pitchers. Now.
  • Teams that score seven runs in a series at Colorado don’t deserve to win
  • When you need a strikeout, and there are switch-hitters coming up, Sergio Romo is much more likely to strike out a left-handed hitter than Javier Lopez is to strike out a right-handed hitter.
  • When you need a strikeout, and there are switch-hitters coming up, Sergio Romo is much more likely to strike out a left-handed hitter than Javier Lopez is to strike out a right-handed hitter.
  • When you need a strikeout, and there are switch-hitters coming up, Sergio Romo is much more likely to strike out a left-handed hitter than Javier Lopez is to strike out a right-handed hitter.

Also of note: when you need a strikeout, and there are switch-hitters coming up, Sergio Romo is much more likely to strike out a left-handed hitter than Javier Lopez is to strike out a right-handed hitter. Romo is the strikeout artist in the bullpen. He’s who you bring in with a runner on third and less than two outs. Lopez is a lefty specialist -- he shouldn’t face righties if you can help it.

But that’s not exactly where the game was lost -- that happened with two singles and an error when Jim Tracy is trying to give away outs. Tracy was saying, "No, no, we’ll make do with five more outs in the game to score two runs. There’s plenty of time," and the Giants said, "No, no. We have plenty of outs in this game -- 22 already! We’ll be fine."

Yuck. Again.

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